Why do artists make their work shiny?*

I simply googled this and found this website:

3 Reasons why artists varnish their work (and why some artists don’t)

The site discusses varnishes. This isn’t what I was looking for but it was still interesting. They talk about a layer of removable vanish is applied to protect the painting. The varnish stops dirt and grime imbedding into the paints surface. They then say the varnish can be removed after some time and the painting can be varnished, this restores the painting. They say it also gives a sheen although it is mainly done for conservation purposes.

Google didn’t result in much so here is to YouTube:

This guys making a mirror finish with oil based interior paint (I think, ‘rustolem’) Look at the amount of work going in to producing this finish! its a lot of work and I don’t think the pressures from sanding would be suitable on canvas. It might work on a metal plate surface. I will have to try!

One good method he mentions is adding soap to your water on the wet and dry stage!

** image of sanded gloss paints on metal**

Didn’t even realise this was a two part video!

https://ux.stackexchange.com/questions/93640/why-do-we-prefer-shiny-finish-on-cars-and-dull-finish-on-devices

In a post by user dennislees on May 5th 2016 (finial edit) they say:

“Consumers found the attention-grabbing gleam of a shiny paint job quite attractive [2], the market adapted to meet that demand, and before long all cars were shiny.” this would suggest that shiny surfaces are eye grabbing and gain attention. This relates to my paintings because I want to compete with others for an audiences attention. I want a viewer to desire. The desire is driven by either an approval or a want to have attention.

in a post by pjc50 on the 4th may 2016 they say:

“Gloss finishes on cars show off the lines of the car in the specular highlights.” This make me wonder about pressing a shape through the back of the canvas so it is forced to provide a shape out the front, when up on the wall. This was a concept I had started thinking about around November 2016. Yet this has been rekindled by Shauna Chapman a friend and peer on the course I am on as of publication.

There we go, I’m happy now someone else said it. Shiny paint looks good, demands attention and arguably improves geometrical shapes/ forms

Posted in Contextualisation YEAR 3, Documentation YEAR 3, Subject YEAR 3